Matt Cipolla Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Matt Cipolla

Matt Cipolla
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
97% Zappa (2020) Zappa does a commendable job at echoing that sort of coke-adjacent counter-culture chaos the artist spun together so uniquely.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Nov 25, 2020
89% Mank (2020) [S]omething of a surprise is how [David Fincher] and the script from his late father, Jack Fincher, lure audiences into a false sense of nostalgia while negating its most amiable aspects.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2020
D+ 45% Fatman (2020) What feels like a Robot Chicken sketch drawn out to 100 minutes doesn't even sound too hopeful in theory, but it didn't have to be this pointless.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2020
B- 95% Fireball: Visitors from Darker Worlds (2020) A logical approach runs through Fireball, but the sheer wonder of it all--and its sly balance of tones--is what prevents it from burning up before making impact.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2020
88% Divine Love (Divino Amor) (2020) The material is timeless, but it thinks it's a timely, sociopolitical warning. As weird as the script thinks it is, it's never really that weird.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Nov 11, 2020
55% Come Play (2020) Jacob Chase's latest is a low-key chiller with an affinity for long, floating takes and 360-degree pans to punctuate its human core--until it isn't.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Oct 29, 2020
C+ 93% Sleep (Schlaf) (2020) Sleep is so full of ideas that it can be a bit too much. It's certainly ambitious and has its moments, but its dream logic grows numb by the end.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2020
B- 100% Sweat (2020) Yes, it's really quite uneven. But while von Horn's script has trouble fitting its themes and plot together, Magdalena Koleśnik's performance commands the good and the bad.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2020
B+ 100% The Reason I Jump (2020) The Reason I Jump knows how to expand upon Higashida's words, using its tools to distill the experience into pure human empathy.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2020
C+ 86% The Prophet and the Space Aliens (2020) Shamir dillies through this group without a large or meaningful enough context, even if he's more empathic than one might expect.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2020
C+ 75% Preparations to be Together for an Unknown Period of Time (2020) No one here acts like a real person. That's part of the main draw, though, so it kind of crumbles once Horvát tries to wrap it all up.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2020
B 92% Dear Comrades (2020) It's bleak, but Dear Comrades! benefits from an ironic distance that gives it a satirical bent without teetering into farce.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2020
C 80% Kubrick by Kubrick (Kubrick par Kubrick) (2020) The idea of making a documentary about the man isn't inherently flawed, but this one's approach is, lacking the insight or visuals to make it feel like more than a glorified clip show.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2020
B- 83% Undine (2020) It's dissonant, often hypnotic filmmaking. It's also rote for stretches, with Petzold's narrative approach surprisingly straightforward enough to make it just decent overall.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2020
B 100% Farewell Amor (2020) It's not oversimplified. [Sylvia endures] colorism and cultural fetishizing, and Lawson gives her role an awkwardness that comes from self-awareness instead of simple insecurity.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2020
B- 100% Finding Yingying (2020) Finding Yingying doesn't plumb the differences between U.S. and Chinese relations as much as the story alludes to, but the sheer emotion of it all largely redeems it.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2020
B- 85% Belushi (2020) [Belushi] works when it examines a culture where movies, music, and TV fall in an ever-changing hierarchy, understanding the tragedy by the end rather than glancing at it.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2020
A- 100% Days (Rizi) (2020) Virtually every gesture, no matter how menial or small, helps remove the screen between subject and audience.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
C 87% The Columnist (De Kuthoer) (2020) It finds its mix of satire and black comedy in the last 15 minutes, but by trying to end on a bang, The Columnist just softens the blow.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
B+ No Score Yet Careless Crime (Jenayat-e bi deghat) (2020) It's not too often a movie trusts its audience this much, and the result is one of the most meta movies this side of Mohsen Makhmalbaf's A Moment of Innocence.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
B+ 99% Totally Under Control (2020) It's almost too fast to keep up with at times, just as it should be. Its themes, talking heads, and points of criticism fractalize until it's hard to remember just how it all began.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2020
81% Charm City Kings (2020) [F]or all the energy both in front of and behind the camera, this thing rides the clutch way too much. It's not necessarily that it's disengaged; it's that it's so rocky.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2020
75% The Cleansing Hour (2019) When the movie works, it's a modest enough riff on The Evil Dead with some fittingly squeamish body horror . . . [but it's] too bare in ideas and execution to stick the landing.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2020
C 89% The Wolf of Snow Hollow (2020) [The pieces] contradict, an exploration of heady themes strapped down by building-block construction.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2020
82% Scare Me (2020) It would have worked well enough at a little over half an hour. But this thing is 100 minutes, and it never seems to end.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2020
86% On The Rocks (2020) Coppola's dialogue, while funny, is overt and sparring enough to simultaneously work as parody and tragedy.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2020
C- 90% The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020) [T]his specific story and its implications deserve a radical approach, and Sorkin's is as centrist and lacking in self-awareness as it is full of hot air.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2020
21% Showgirls (1995) Showgirls' Camp influences, even shades of deliberate Camp, aren't so much the film itself but in-universe productions compartmentalizing excess into metatext.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2020
C+ 64% The Devil All the Time (2020) Too amoral to be cynical and too stagnant to be bitter, this Gothic tale confuses its pieces just enough to prevent it from leaving an impact.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2020
B 93% Residue (2020) A collage of distant memories and the realities that threaten them, Residue is an auspicious calling card for its filmmaker.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Sep 17, 2020
28% Antebellum (2020) Telegraphing its flaws would be one thing, but this would-be mindtrick doubles down on its worst impulses time and time again.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2020
87% The Nest (2020) The Nest isn't a movie that feels timeless just because of its content. The Nest feels timeless because it's always on the edge.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2020
B- 95% The Mole Agent (2020) The Mole Agent may stumble through some of its choices at first, but it sticks the landing by finding a cogitative dissonance and refusing to solve it.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2020
82% Bill & Ted Face the Music (2020) While Excellent Adventure was novel and Bogus Journey was unabashedly bizarre, Bill & Ted Face the Music tries to have real stakes while rehashing the past.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2020
B 92% Epicentro (2020) This lack of objectivity is blatant . . . and as part impressionistic work and part ethnography, Epicentro often turns counterintuitive into crucial.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2020
58% Random Acts of Violence (2020) Jay Baruchel's film lacks both the pathos and ironic distance to get anything out of its premise.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2020
B+ 100% Son of the White Mare (Fehérlófia) (1982) [T]he result is a striking mix of centuries past, prog psychedelia, and an Atari 2600 game. And no, that isn't a bad thing.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2020
B- 100% Coup 53 (2020) Coup 53 isn't the most coherent in approach or pacing, but its ambition--and overall literacy--ties its knots. And hey, that's an accomplishment in and of itself.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2020
C 83% Skin: A History of Nudity in the Movies (2020) If there were one word to describe Skin, it would be tenuous. Its collections of tidbits and talking heads point to a deeper analysis, but they don't go all the way.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Aug 18, 2020
79% Out Stealing Horses (Ut og Stjæle Hester) (2020) Moland relies on glacial pacing to underscore the sensuality before having his hero declare what's happening instead of simply showing it.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2020
73% An American Pickle (2020) Aside from the occasional chuckle and a refreshing cultural specificity at times, it's too scattershot to leave an impression.‐ The Spool
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2020
B 100% His House (2020) With Weekes' use of iconography in contexts both gorgeous and graphic, he finds a hegemony only to crack it open.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
B+ 100% The Father (2020) Scenes, sequences, and arcs fray at the edges until they snake in on themselves.‐ The Film Stage
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
1/5 20% Cats (2019) Add in the tonal shifts and performances that never feel like they're in the same movie, and out comes a cat scratch fever dream that can only be enjoyed ironically.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
2/5 51% Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019) The Rise of Skywalker is so scared of doing something wrong that, by the end, it doesn't do much at all.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
4/5 95% Little Women (2019) It is, like its balance between autonomy and collectivism, a look at ethics that are prescribed and personalized, and most places in between.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
2.5/5 77% Frozen II (2019) Frozen II may sing about change, but that progress is what you project onto it.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
2.5/5 77% Doctor Sleep (2019) It's a fascinating idea, taking from both Kubrick and King in order to make a composite of events and themes. Flanagan, however, just ends up with a contradiction.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
4.5/5 96% The Irishman (2019) Zaillian follows Scorsese; Scorsese follows himself; they both follow Brandt, whose end goal is nothing if not ephemeral. The disconnect shouldn't work, but here it's the crux.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020
2.5/5 80% Jojo Rabbit (2019) This is a satire that's too afraid to put anyone off, and the result is surprisingly anodyne.‐ Film Monthly
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2020