Matthew Lucas Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/4 86% Million Dollar Mermaid (1952) Truly one of the most beautiful films of the 1950s, and it's a pleasure to watch Berkeley indulge his more expressionistic tendencies with a full palate of breathtaking color.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Aug 1, 2020
2.5/4 100% Girl Crazy (1943) Berkeley was fired from the film after choreographic the "I Got Rhythm" finale, and as a result the film never quite achieves the same effortless charm his earlier collaborations between Rooney and Garland‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Aug 1, 2020
3/4 100% The Cameraman (1928) An important missing piece in Keaton's oeuvre, but it represents a turning point in his career from which he would never recover.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
4/4 97% Come and See (Idi i smotri) (1985) An unrelenting experience, yet it's filled with a kind of grim, haunting beauty that's hard to shake, recalling Tarkovsky almost religious sense of weight in its remarkable evocation of horror and utter despair. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2020
3/4 86% Romance on the High Seas (1948) An easy-going crowd pleaser, and it's easy to see why Day became such a huge star - her effervescent, folksy charm feels almost effortless.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2020
3.5/4 No Score Yet Strike Up the Band (1940) Rooney and Garland are full of effervescent charm, and Berkeley delivers some of his strongest numbers of his MGM period.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2020
0/4 No Score Yet Child Bride (1938) When the camera begins to leer at young Shirley Mills from the POV of her pedophilic suitor, the film ceases to be a goofy grindhouse curio and becomes something truly, darkly exploitative.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
2.5/4 No Score Yet Tomorrow's Children (1934) As a melodrama it's actually one of the most engaging exploitation films of the period. The performances are universally strong, and the film feels less like an amateur production and more like an actual film."‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
2/4 No Score Yet Narcotic (1937) Of all of Dwain Esper's moralistic exploitation films of the 1930s, Narcotic is perhaps the "best," although I use that term loosely because you know going in basically what you're going to get here.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
1/4 No Score Yet Marihuana (1936) Has the distinction of being one of the most unintentionally hilarious of these sanctimonious "issues of today" films of the period due to the sheer outlandishness of its plot.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
3.5/4 93% Yourself and Yours (2020) One of Hong's most lovingly nuanced works, a film filled with longing and regret that finds great beauty in the in-between moments.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jun 23, 2020
3.5/5 81% Hill of Freedom (Jayuui Eondeok) (2020) Hong guides this small-scale wonder with a hint of mischief and a knack for deconstructing narratives and reconstructing them into something new and wonderful.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jun 23, 2020
3/4 92% The Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933) With no musical score to guide the audience, we're often left adrift in Igor's madhouse, conjuring up some truly haunting imagery that has been beautifully restored on the new Blu-Ray from Warner Archive.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2020
3.5/4 100% Spring Night, Summer Night (1970) The resurrection of an important piece of American independent cinema, a jagged, piercing look at small town life and the ruinous effects of economic depression that feels more relevant than ever.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2020
3.5/4 92% Da 5 Bloods (2020) Not only a powerful, elegiac tribute for the black soldiers who served in Vietnam, but a haunting and complex examination of the war's dark legacy, both for America and for people of Vietnam. ‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
3.5/4 73% The King of Staten Island (2020) Disarmingly strong; a perceptive and smartly written love letter to Davidson's family that feels like a comedic revelation.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
2.5/4 98% Fourteen (2020) Consistently filled with wise insights into the nature of human connections and the general ennui of millennial life, seeking stability where there is none to be found.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
3/4 88% AKA Jane Roe (2020) As fascinating, as frustrating, and as full of life as she was. It's a moving, must-watch experience.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2020
3.5/4 55% Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967) The golden version gives the film a heated, otherworldly quality, as if its characters are wondering around in some sort of erotic dream, lost in a tangled web of their own unexplored desires. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted May 13, 2020
3/4 100% Blood on the Moon (1948) Mitchum manages to find a sense of moral ambiguity to his amoral gunslinger that elevates the film above your typical western B-movie. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted May 13, 2020
3/4 87% Spaceship Earth (2020) A mildly diverting documentary that makes for some intriguing quarantine viewing, painting a big picture but ultimately failing to ask big questions.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
2/4 38% Downhill (2020) Takes a troubling and uncomfortable study of human relationships and turns it into mildly entertaining sitcom.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted May 8, 2020
3.5/4 100% The Golem (Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam) (1920) Remains one of the most beautifully designed and evocative films of its time, and it hasn't lost any of its eerie luster in the century since its release.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
2.5/4 86% Tartuffe (1925) Murnau is, of course, an incredible visual stylist, and the golden-tinted hues of Karl Freund's cinematography are often breathtaking. But Tartuffe is ultimately one of Murnau's minor works.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
3/4 93% Bad Education (2019) An engaging tale of corruption, vanity, and hubris that gives Jackman one of his meatiest roles to date. ‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2020
3.5/4 100% I Wish I Knew (Hai shang chuan qi) (2020) A city symphony in a minor key, reminiscent of Pennebaker and Ruttman, that searches for the soul of a people and finds a microcosm of a century of upheaval and uncertainty.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2020
2/4 37% Wendy (2020) A film of muddled mythology and listless characterization, burying its sense of childhood magic in drab new trappings that feel bland and uninspired.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2020
3.5/4 93% The Wild Goose Lake (Nan fang che zhan de ju hui) (2020) Diao wraps his scathing indictment of Chinese state capitalism in a package of sensationally choreographed action and nearly operatic violence.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
3.5/4 52% Bamboozled (2000) It works overtime to throw the audience off balance, to alienate us in almost Brechtian fashion, holding us at arm's length but demanding our attention as if saying "don't look away, you need to see this."‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2020
4/4 75% Potomok Chingis-Khana (Storm over Asia) (The Heir to Genghis Khan) (1929) By focusing on non-white characters, Pudovkin also dismisses the inherent racism with which such cultures were viewed at the time, a move that seems revolutionary in and of itself.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 8, 2020
3.5/4 83% The End of St. Petersburg (1927) Display(s) a real passion for the plight of the proletariat, feeling less like propaganda and more like communist apologia, focusing less on the politics of the Bolsheviks and more on the basis for the Revolution in the first place.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 8, 2020
4/4 No Score Yet Mother (1926) The climactic scene, in which the mother stands alone against charging Czarist forces, her flag held high and defiant, is one of the most deeply moving images in all Soviet cinema.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Apr 8, 2020
3/4 88% Onward (2020) There's something strangely comforting in this time of national uncertainty to be found in this film about rediscovering simple magic in a world governed by technology.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2020
2.5/4 71% Stargirl (2020) Its themes of being unique and true to yourself feel lost in a film that's trying so desperately to fit in.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2020
3.5/4 98% Paris Is Burning (1991) Both an exuberant portrait of gay culture and queer defiance during a time when visibility was low and discrimination was high.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2020
3.5/4 80% The Song of Songs (1933) It's hard not to admire the gutsiness of what Mamoulian achieves here, crafting a film that is ultimately a critique of itself and the very audience that's watching it.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2020
0/4 56% The Hunt (2020) This one's not worth risking the spread of coronavirus - stay home and avoid this film like the plague.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2020
3.5/4 98% Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Portrait de la jeune fille en feu) (2020) Sciamma seems to be inventing love anew, giving us something at once familiar, like the lingering memory of lovers long past, and vibrantly, thrillingly new.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2020
2/4 No Score Yet Mom and Dad (1945) Unlike many of its contemporaries who sought to warn parents about the dangers facing the youth of its day, Mom and Dad has an actual story with real actors who are actually mildly compelling. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2020
3.5/4 91% The Invisible Man (2020) As Whannell builds tension past the point where other films would have offered a cheap payoff, he instead continues to turn the screw, resulting in a film that's not only scary, but genuinely surprising.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2020
2.5/4 62% The Call of the Wild (2020) An old school adventure about a big dog with an even bigger heart that feels tailor-made for the old cliché - "they just don't make 'em like this anymore."‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2020
4/4 98% All About My Mother (Todo sobre mi madre) (1999) For all the film's purple prose and soap opera dramatics, Almodóvar never loses sight of his characters' simple humanity.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
4/4 91% Je t'aime moi non plus (I Love You, I Don't) (1976) One of the great unheralded cinematic romances of all time - a love story like no other that deserves a place in the canon of all-time classics.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
1/4 13% The Oscar (1966) Worth watching for the truly bizarre plotting and dialogue, which plays like a bad daytime soap opera complete with dramatic music stingers. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
.5/4 No Score Yet Sex Madness (Human Wreckage: They Must Be Told) (1938) May spend most of its brief running time wagging its finger at its audience, but its sensationalistic subject matter was clearly designed to titillate while preaching a very different message.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
1/4 39% Reefer Madness (Tell Your Children) (Doped Youth) (1936) Strictly an amateur-hour production, filled with laughably over-the-top acting and a silly sense of self-righteousness that make it the perfect exploitation camp classic.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
2/4 62% Sonic the Hedgehog (2020) The epitome of soulless studio product, a paint-by-numbers action comedy that feels like the reheated leftovers of an early 2000s buddy comedy.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Feb 17, 2020
3/4 78% Le Petit Soldat (The Little Soldier) (2013) Perhaps more interesting for what it foreshadows in Godard's career than anything contained in the film itself. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
3/4 78% Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2020) A gleefully over-the-top, candy-colored comic book spectacle that finds a pleasing balance between character and action that puts it a cut above its superhero peers.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
3.5/4 65% Gretel & Hansel (2020) Feels right at home amongst the work of such Italian masters as (Dario) Argento and Mario Bava, whose films often felt like they took place inside a nightmare where plot didn't matter so much as atmosphere and mood.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2020