The Firm - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Firm Reviews

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July 24, 2017
DIRECTORS CUT

Clarke's film is unflinching, uncompromising and the essence of brutality in mindless, horrifying violence. Performances are truly stunning with Oldman giving his most bipolar and schizophrenia performance to date, one minute a likeable and funny character, then turning into a monster the next.
September 8, 2016
There are loads of great things I can say about Alan Clarke's "The Firm." Number (1) It has a great example about "Football Hooliganism." that delivers a lot of aggression and hatred to certain faces. For example: Bex (Gary Oldman) who you can tell from the start of the movie that he is a loose cannon, and if anything gets out of hand with him or his crew, you know you are going to pay the price. Bex carries a Stanley Blade around with him. Mainly for some of his brutal attacks. There is a scene where we see Bex slicing someone's face. The person did the same thing to one of Bex's gang members. There is another person in the movie who goes by the name of Yeti(Phil Davis) and seems like another Bex in a way. But in one scene in the movie we really get the hatred and anger Bex feels about Yeti. There is a scene where bex goes back to his mum's house to pick up some essentials. He flips a Police baton, and starts hitting his pillow very aggressively, shouting "Yeti!" over and over. There is another person that I liked in the movie, and that was Bex's wife, Sue(Lesley Manville) who loves Bex, but doesn't like the style he lives. Especially in a scene where we see their only son root threw Bex's pockets and finds Bex's Stanley Knife, and starts brushing his teeth with it. It's obvious when the audience see that, they are going to go "No! Not the baby." Well I know I did. After that incident, we see an argument between Bex and Sue about their baby's safety. Bex doesn't really show much sadness or guilt about it because the only thing on his mind is Yeti. But you will have to watch the movie to find out if Bex finally "Had Yeti."
½ December 5, 2014
An outstanding performance by Gary Oldman for this fine TV movie by Alan Clarke, with Oldman as a successful family man who still has a nasty streak and is a soccer hooligan. As the story goes, the violence rips his family apart and ultimately destroys him. Required viewing for fans of either Oldman or great British realism in cinema.
½ February 17, 2014
Alan Clarke, in what appears to be his trademark style, turns a clear and steady eye on English hooligan culture and the simian impulses on which it feeds. Gary Oldman is, appropriately, a force of nature as the alpha male.
December 7, 2012
Meant to be awesome! Plus a cult film. One of Oldman's best possibly!
½ October 27, 2012
A English soccer movie, if your a soccer fan you will like this, if not then you probably won't...Gary oldman is great as always but it isn't a great film
May 20, 2012
Dude.. Gary Oldman + Football firms = epic
½ March 23, 2012
The best football hooligan film ever made. Gary Oldmans breakthrough performance and probably one of his best.
½ March 5, 2012
Oldman jyrää mutta osittain lyhyen kestonsa takia elokuva jää henkilökuvaukseltaan torsoksi.
½ November 30, 2011
Really good movie. Intense and simple. Gary Oldman's performance is very good, Definitely a movie worth watching especially if you're a football fan.
½ August 14, 2011
Football hooligans, don't you just want to give them all a big hug and a cup of tea? So what can I say about a film that follows small groups of relatively middle class football hooligans in the mid 80s, who live their sad little lives thinking they actually amount to something of value? Taken together with a clear and shocking lack of effective risk assessment in terms of the use of Stanley knives (amongst other things), it all makes for a fun packed 67 minutes. This is actually a very good film, well acted and depressingly believable; it even has some rather black humour in it at times. It has a depressing ending too; two World Wars and one World Cup? Twats. Makes me want to emigrate. Actually the dynamics between the characters are great and the 'action scenes' are too. Plenty of tooled up nutters, dodgy pubs, a strippergram and people shouting and yelling at one another. In all honesty, who doesn't like all of those things? Oh, okay, everyone; but they're good in a film aren't they? And ,£178.50 for three adults and a child from London to Birmingham, First Class. (I just had a look and the equivalent now is a scary ,£861.00). I blame Margaret Thatcher for all this.

No cats and no decapitations. Top Badass moment: In a film of this type it's hard to find true badass behaviour, as they're all basically, em, (tries to think of a word I can use that's acceptable here), Silly Billies. However, I was impressed with the bravery of the group that crossed the main road outside King's Cross Station. Anyone that knows the six lanes of traffic there should now have a grudging respect for them (well the actors anyway), as most of the cars were clearly not driven by stunt people. 7 out of 10.
½ August 14, 2011
Mindless hooligans running around acting the big man. Good performances but i can't see past the fact its JUST FOOTBALL!
April 24, 2011
BEST HOOLIE FILM EVER MADE! EAST,EAST ,EAST LONDON!! :)

5 FCUKIN STARS!! *****!!
March 28, 2011
an early take on football violence,a good bbc film...
March 6, 2011
Phil Mitchell in this too lol
March 6, 2011
Loads better than the recent remake,Gary Oldman is Superb as Bex and there is even Mickey Pearce and Phil Mitchell in it in early roles
September 3, 2010
Like Made in Britain, The Firm is a raw, unrelenting, and brutal film that demonstrates Alan Clarke's brilliance. In The Firm, Clarke delves into the lives of British football hooligans who divide themselves into different firms (or gangs). Gary Oldman delivers an unforgettable performance as Bex, the leader of one firm who desires to get all the British firms to join forces for the upcoming European Championships. Unfortunately, the firms remain incapable of healing the rifts between them.

In many ways, The Firm could be considered a precursor of Fight Club--it concerns a seemingly responsible man who works as a real estate agent to support his wife and young child. But Bex has another life as well, a life that fulfills him in ways that his normal, nuclear family lifestyle cannot. He requires the buzz that he gets from fighting with other firms and vandalizing their property. The firm provides not just a sense of belonging but also an outlet for the pent up emotions that Bex and his comrades must repress during their "normal" lives. The Firm is a powerful exploration of gang violence, but it is also a profound interrogation of bourgeois values and repression, particularly with regards to masculinity. Bexie and the other hooligans have had masculine gender roles burnt into their psychic structures, but their quotidian lives provide no outlets for them to proof their strength, cunning, and machismo. Instead, they must resort to their hooligan antics of drinking absurd amounts of alcohol, yelling constantly, and fighting whenever possible. The Firm criticizes this values but also rather astutely criticizes the repressive bourgeois episteme that gives rise to them.
Like Made in Britain, The Firm is a raw, unrelenting, and brutal film that demonstrates Alan Clarke's brilliance. In The Firm, Clarke delves into the lives of British football hooligans who divide themselves into different firms (or gangs). Gary Oldman delivers an unforgettable performance as Bex, the leader of one firm who desires to get all the British firms to join forces for the upcoming European Championships. Unfortunately, the firms remain incapable of healing the rifts between them. In many ways, The Firm could be considered a precursor of Fight Club--it concerns a seemingly responsible man who works as a real estate agent to support his wife and young child. But Bex has another life as well, a life that fulfills him in ways that his normal, nuclear family lifestyle cannot. He requires the buzz that he gets from fighting with other firms and vandalizing their property. The firm provides not just a sense of belonging but also an outlet for the pent up emotions that Bex and his comrades must repress during their "normal" lives. The Firm is a powerful exploration of gang violence, but it is also a profound interrogation of bourgeois values and repression, particularly with regards to masculinity. Bexie and the other hooligans have had masculine gender roles burnt into their psychic structures, but their quotidian lives provide no outlets for them to proof their strength, cunning, and machismo. Instead, they must resort to their hooligan antics of drinking absurd amounts of alcohol, yelling constantly, and fighting whenever possible. The Firm criticizes this values but also rather astutely criticizes the repressive bourgeois episteme that gives rise to them.
September 2, 2010
Like Made in Britain, The Firm is a raw, unrelenting, and brutal film that demonstrates Alan Clarke's brilliance. In The Firm, Clarke delves into the lives of British football hooligans who divide themselves into different firms (or gangs). Gary Oldman delivers an unforgettable performance as Bex, the leader of one firm who desires to get all the British firms to join forces for the upcoming European Championships. Unfortunately, the firms remain incapable of healing the rifts between them.

In many ways, The Firm could be considered a precursor of Fight Club--it concerns a seemingly responsible man who works as a real estate agent to support his wife and young child. But Bex has another life as well, a life that fulfills him in ways that his normal, nuclear family lifestyle cannot. He requires the buzz that he gets from fighting with other firms and vandalizing their property. The firm provides not just a sense of belonging but also an outlet for the pent up emotions that Bex and his comrades must repress during their "normal" lives. The Firm is a powerful exploration of gang violence, but it is also a profound interrogation of bourgeois values and repression, particularly with regards to masculinity. Bexie and the other hooligans have had masculine gender roles burnt into their psychic structures, but their quotidian lives provide no outlets for them to proof their strength, cunning, and machismo. Instead, they must resort to their hooligan antics of drinking absurd amounts of alcohol, yelling constantly, and fighting whenever possible. The Firm criticizes this values but also rather astutely criticizes the repressive bourgeois episteme that gives rise to them.
Super Reviewer
June 29, 2010
I'm rating "The Firm" as high as three stars mostly because of Gary Oldman's fiery performance, but the sports-goon mentality depicted in this film is so alien and repulsive to me that I really had a hard time keeping a scowl off my face while watching. I also must plead guilty to having difficulty understanding some of the dialogue, between the heavy accents and the regional slang.

The directing of the final scene puzzled me -- it almost played like a segment from the evening news, where the characters were swaggering in front of some unseen interview correspondent. A strange shift in tone. Almost like breaking the fourth wall.
May 13, 2010
Lean, brutal, but substantive, thoughtful and measured. An absolutely outstanding script which seems more like the originator (rather than pastiche) of many famous contemporary idioms. Gary Oldman is sadly set up for typecasting from here on in, though his character, Bex, operates on many levels, some of which are recognisably empathetic, humane, every-man. The shocking power of his internalised, and then released, anger and violence is what caught the eye of each casting lead for the next ten years of his career...I'm thinking of Leon, Fifth Element, etc. As Sirius Black, we at last get a look back at the tenderness he's obviously capable of, as seen in interaction with his child in The Firm. Of course this film is not about that - but rather, the phenomenon of hooliganism in the late 1980s. Alan Clarke, following up Scum, brings a disturbing, gripping vision of lower-middle class London thrill-seeking violence.
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