We Are Who We Are: Season 1 - TV Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

We Are Who We Are: Season 1 Reviews

February 8, 2021
The first episode is very different to the second one, which is very different to the third and fourth. Everything you think you've settled on about the character's story it drags you in a different direction.
December 1, 2020
If Normal People reminded older viewers of their own first love, We Are Who We Are might remind them of their own sexual awakening. But then, was it anything as languid and magic-realist as this? Unlikely.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
November 23, 2020
It takes a daring director to ask us to not just sympathise but empathise with a boy like Fraser. And Guadagnino is certainly that.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
November 4, 2020
Something feels perpetually missing from We Are Who We Are, and while longing and searching are big themes for the series, it makes for a frustrating overall viewing experience, the depth of these characters often obscured by hasty storytelling.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
October 6, 2020
Guadagnino's sumptuous tastes fold naturally into the obsessions of Fraser...Luca's series is set on a military base that is charmed, foreboding, and thrumming...
September 15, 2020
Showrunning demands a different skill set than filmmaking, and not all of Guadagnino's masterful abilities come to the fore, here.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/10
September 14, 2020
The show works best when following the spontaneous actions of its subjects, especially in the moments when they quite literally have nothing else to do.
September 14, 2020
It's not a traditional television show. It's poetry. It's a photograph of a moment in time. Every episode is an invitation to just sit within those verses and pictures and appreciate them, without judgment.
Top Critic
September 14, 2020
Nothing about these characters seems fixed and resolved, which is why We Are Who We Are feels like such a startlingly truthful depiction of adolescence, in all its confusing, and often thrilling, fluidity.
September 14, 2020
When the story finally starts to move, what emerges isn't a galvanizing problem so much as a sense that each character, no matter how seemingly clear, will come to surprise us.
September 14, 2020
It's an impossibly grand and intimate ending, one well-suited for the eight-episode story we just saw, though whether it's the absolute ending of "We Are Who We Are" remains up in the air.
Full Review | Original Score: A
September 14, 2020
It's a finely detailed, living fresco of libido and intoxication, all these teenagers inhabiting their bodies as if they were just-unwrapped birthday presents.
September 14, 2020
A glorious feast for the senses and a tonic for the soul that aims to keep viewers warm as we plunge into an uncertain fall.
September 11, 2020
The series concerns itself with boundaries and the way they blur.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
September 11, 2020
This story is contemporary, lively, and breathtakingly human, dwelling in the awkwardness of teenage exploration and sensation with an honesty that is at times painful.
September 8, 2020
It's so visceral as to become unsettling -- but what else is being a teenager like, if not immersive, visceral and unsettling?
September 2, 2020
Despite some flat characters, Guadagnino exuberantly spotlights his cast of up-and-comers, especially Corey Knight.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
September 2, 2020
An aura of pleasant aimlessness suffuses the production, its evocation of eternal summer mirroring the teens' approach to their here-but-not-really-ness. But of course the scripts are meticulously crafted.
September 1, 2020
Few transplants from the big screen to the small have as keen an eye, or ear, as Guadagnino, so the voyeuristic nature of the storytelling feels inviting rather than indulgent. (Mostly).
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5